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A Glass of Wine under a Starry Sky

Ciao Come Stai? 

Do you Know How to Drink a Glass of Wine ?

Watch this Video: 

And Now Are you looking for an awesome Experience ? Do you want to know something about Sicilian LifeStyle?

You’re Welcome to “A Glass of Wine under a Starry Sky” aMarina di Cala del Sole, Licata (AG), Friday 1oth August 2012.

Sicily is the Island of Fine Wine, famous cuisine, legendary history and traditions.

Friday 1oth August August 2012, Marina di Cala del Sole brings Sicily to you, to experience delicious dishes and excellent wine enjoying the Mediterranean atmosphere of Licata  and tasting  special wine ring-shaped cakes  prepared  by Elena Curzio of Associazione Nazionale Cuoche a Domicilio (National Association of  Cooks at Home).

Let’s Improve your Italian reading a Special Recipe that you can Taste at this Wine Exibition mentioned above. The name of this Special Recipe is Ciambelle al Vino (Wine Ring-Shaped Cakes).

Ciambelle al Vino 

Ingredienti: 

-1 bicchiere di Zucchero;

-1 bicchiere di Vino a piacere;

-1 bicchiere di Olio d’Oliva;

-3 bicchieri di Farina;

-1 pizzico di Bicarbonato.

Amalgamare i liquidi, aggiungere la farina per un impasto morbido. Formare delle ciambelline e spolverare con zucchero solo su un lato e cucinare a forno a 180° per 20 minuti.

I’ve found  interesting  articles about Sicilian Wine as well.  Here below an extract from http://www.thinksicily.com/guide-to-sicily/food-and-wine-in-sicily/sicilian-wine.aspx: 

Sicilian Wine, an Age-Old Tradition.

According to legend, Dionysus (aka Bacchus) was the God who brought pleasure to mankind, and wine to Sicily.

Legend aside, it is certain that wine has been made in Sicily for millennia. There is evidence that Mycenaean traders cultivated grapes in the Aeolian Islands as early at 1,500 BC and when the Greeks began to settle in Sicily in the 8th century BC, they too were unable forgo their favourite libation, “oinos“, and introduced several varieties of vines.

The next important date in Sicilian wine history is 1773, the year John Woodhouse started producing what was to become one of the island’s most famous products: Marsala.

Woodhouse understood immediately that the decent local wine could be transformed, using in perpetuum techniques (similar to the solera system used to make sherry), which, through the addition of alcohol, would not only fortify the wine but also help it survive the sea journey back to England in tact. It was an instant success with the British, and other entrepreneurs, such as Ingham and Whitaker, soon hurried out to exploit the wine’s popularity.

Towards the end of the 19th century, the English dominion in Marsala-making was brought to an end by the arrival of Vincenzo Florio, one of Italy’s first tycoons, who bought up much of the land around Marsala. Cantine Florio, though in different hands today, remains one of the best producers of Marsala and a visit of their enormous barrel-filled winery is recommended.

For most of the 20th century, Sicily continued to produce enormous quantities of grapes, most of which, however, were exported to be added to wine made elsewhere in Italy.

The last 20 years have seen enormous changes to the island’s wine culture and, as the many international prizes won by Sicilian producers confirm, some of Italy’s finest wines are now being made in Sicily. A new generation of Sicilian producers are realising the full potential of the island’s enviable climate, its autochthonous grape varieties and its fertile soil.

Sicily is a wine-lover’s paradise, such is the variety, complexity and abundance of Bacchus’ unique gift.

Special thanks go to Tenuta La Lumia and Salvatore La Lumia for their Special Wines used for the preparation of Elena’s Wine Cakes. 


Learn Italian & Buon Appetito. 

Stefania 


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